Summer Intern Poster Day

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Congratulations and farewell to our cohort of undergraduate interns! Today the students wrapped up their 10 weeks at the Observatory by presenting their research to friends, family and the Lamont community. Students worked alongside our scientists in the lab and field, investigating a wide range of topics in Earth and ocean science, from how temperature has changed over the past 12,000 years in the high Arctic, to the ways in which future climate variability and change may impact water resources and ecosystems across western North America. Check out more photos from the day on our Facebook page.

Today’s #FieldPhotoFriday comes from graduate student Allison Jacobel, who spent two months collecting sediment cores on the RSS James Cook in 2013.
americangeophysicalunion:

Saludos de Tenerife!
The Canary Islands are spectacular but I’m already eager to get underway on our research cruise across the Atlantic Ocean! I can’t wait to take sediment cores, water samples and explore the ocean floor using our the ROV Isis.
Look for another postcard from Trinidad and Tobago when we dock in two months and don’t forget to check out our blog!
Allison Jacobel, Ph.D. Student at Columbia University

Today’s #FieldPhotoFriday comes from graduate student Allison Jacobel, who spent two months collecting sediment cores on the RSS James Cook in 2013.

americangeophysicalunion:

Saludos de Tenerife!

The Canary Islands are spectacular but I’m already eager to get underway on our research cruise across the Atlantic Ocean! I can’t wait to take sediment cores, water samples and explore the ocean floor using our the ROV Isis.

Look for another postcard from Trinidad and Tobago when we dock in two months and don’t forget to check out our blog!

Allison Jacobel, Ph.D. Student at Columbia University

Field Photo Friday

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Margie Turrin captured this shot of the small village of Kullorsuaq in northwest Greenland, where she and postdoc Dave Porter are working with local community members to collect water column temperature profiles. These ocean measurements will help scientists understand why nearby Alison is surging to the sea faster than other glaciers in the area. Learn more about this project from Turrin and Porter’s website and follow their blog for updates from the field. 

What Geology Has to Say About Global Warming

Last month I gave a public lecture entitled, When Maine was California, to an audience in a small town in Maine. It drew parallels between California, today, and Maine, four hundred million years ago, when similar geologic processes were occurring. Afterward, a member of the audience asked me what geology had to say about global warming. The following is an expanded version of my answer.

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